Team Ritual of the Quarter

Olaf Krop  

A veteran of over 1000 team, division, regional and international meetings and trainings.  Board member Olaf Krop will, on a quarterly basis, bring to you a powerful ritual, ceremony or exercise. First, definitions:

Exercise: An exercise honors knowledge, fitness or wisdom. It serves to increase these elements. An exercise may be useful in ‘sharpening the sword’ or to reveal to others more about themselves or teammates. 

Ceremony:  A ceremony honors time, events or accomplishment. Ceremony might be used to honor a man’s accomplishment, or to reveal a time in someone’s life that something important happened. Honoring a man’s commitment though a “completion ceremony” is a common subject.

Ritual: Ritual honors space, relationship or connection. Ritual sometimes has no words. Ritual is an event that everyone does together and can create a transcendental experience. Ritual can also precede or come after a ceremony or exercise. Kind of like the stretching you may do before working out. 

MUD ROOM – A CLEARING 

In the first few minutes of a call or meeting, create the space for men to be 100 percent present.

“In snowy climates, many homes often have a ‘mud room’ that allow you to take off your dirty boots, wet clothes and shake off the dirt and mud before you step into the warmth and light of your home. This ‘Mud Room’ is a place for you to transition, so you can step into this space clean and present. Please take a moment to settle, and to think of what you need to say or do in order to be 100% present at this meeting. I encourage you to reveal this to the men, so that we can do the work necessary to serve the men, women and children who rely on our best.”

Allow up to 60 seconds for each man to reveal, if he chooses. It could be a win, a challenge or simply getting something off his chest. It is not mandatory to speak, and it is not advised to respond, other than with ‘Thank you. Who is next?’ If a man is seriously unsettled or unresolved, you can decide to devote some time to him.  

‘Thank you men. I appreciate your commitment and leadership. Let’s get to work.”

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