Insight For The Modern Man

James Anthony Ellis
Southwest Region

Where else do you find this?

I tell you where you find this: when you die. When they pack your old carcass in ice or stuff that ole body of yours in a cooled drawer for a bit, before they either dig a hole to lower you, or incinerate your body into ash. At this time, so many men finally get that special opportunity to be honored.

Just in time.

To be honored is to be acknowledged by your peers, these brothers in arms who have watched you progress over a certain amount of time, within a certain job, or through the journey that is your life.

I have observed that it happens very rarely for so many men of our day and age, as well as in previous generations.

Oh sure there are the other times when men are honored.

  • The toast at a wedding … often times in the form of a roast by the best man.
  • Medals post-battle for the military.
  • Retirement parties, back when men worked at a company long enough to retire.
  • At times of victory, as in a Toastmaster’s table-topics win, a bowling or softball league trophy, or – for those very few – skating around the ice rink holding the Stanley Cup.
  • The deathbed scene where dear family members gather around and give some real and raw sentiments straight from the heart.

That’s what has become of the simple process of honoring another man – very rare, if at all.

But this is not the case within MDI circles. The men here do not wait until the deathbed, the trophy ceremony or the graveside testimonial. We here recognize that men need acknowledgment on their path. It’s a rich experience. To give and to receive the feedback from our male peers – straightforward, honest, real. In this “honoring,” it’s not so that we can receive fake accolades, get a pat on the back or have smoke blown up our ass. The honoring comes from a place that truly wishes to give something of value to another.

Since we have so many opportunities to serve in leadership positions, and since we meet regularly to see how men have progressed, the honoring happens often within our circles. And that is a good thing. Good for us. Way to go MDI … don’t freakin’ wait until the old man is taking his last breath.

Boost that man up.  Give him the truth that will either lift him up, or inspire him to do a better job the next time.

I honor MDI … an organization that recognizes the very real need of honoring its own.


Speaking of Honoring, I must give a “shout out” to each man on the MDI Media Team. Here they are, the men helping to put MDI on the global map:


Justin LaBarge
, New England

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A man who can not be flustered, but who keeps on the track, remaining in relationship – with the drive to uplift those people he meets.

 

 

Abe Moore, Southwest Region

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Focused, lasered, truth-teller, this man kicks ass, tells it like he sees it and does so with a humble heart.

 

Fred Rai, Eastern Canada Region

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The love this man has for his son radiates so strong that it actually uplifts and inspires all around him.

 

 

Frank Tritini, Mid-Atlantic Region

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Gritty, smart, unbending, this man shares his magician’s wisdom with the selfless spirit of a warrior.

 

 

Steven Creary, Southeast Region

An intense man who is passionate about honorstevencrearywhat the hell is really going on out in the world, and within his circle of men.

 

 

 

Miles Patterson, Western Canada Region

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A creative spark, this artist has much to offer his world. I can’t wait to see what grows from the seed he plants with his creativity.

 

 

Douglas Ernst, Western Region

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Solid and steady, this trust-worthy soul has a transparency and authenticity that makes it safe just by being around him.

 

 

Syd Salmon, Eastern Canada Region

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An honorary member of our Media Team, this man willingly and freely offers his insight and wisdom with the true desire all are made better for it.

 

 

Thank you to the MDI Media Team – we will put MDI on the world radar, touching the lives of the global community of men.